How Does a Beam Bridge Work?

In its most basic form, a beam bridge consists of a horizontal beam that is supported at each end by piers. The weight of the beam pushes straight down on the piers. The beam itself must be strong so that it doesn’t bend under its own weight and the added weight of crossing traffic.

How Does a Beam Bridge Work?

A beam bridge is one of the most common types of bridges used in road and railway construction today. It is a simple structure designed to span a gap between two points, usually by making use of the support of a beam or a series of beams. The bridge is usually made of steel or concrete and is usually supported by a number of abutments or piers.

Beam bridges are usually used to span short distances (under 300 feet) as they are relatively inexpensive and easy to construct. The basic structure of a beam bridge is simple in nature. It consists of a horizontal beam that is supported by two abutments or piers at either end of the span. This beam is then supported by a number of vertical columns that are attached to the abutments. The columns are usually made of reinforced concrete, although some beam bridges are constructed using steel.

The construction of a beam bridge begins with the placement of the abutments or piers. These are usually made of reinforced concrete, although in some cases they may be made of steel. The abutments are designed to support the load of the bridge, and the beams that will be used to span the gap, as well as providing a solid foundation for the structure. Once the ab

Related Posts

Leave a comment