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How Does Drizzle Differ from Rain?

Most commonly observed, drops larger than drizzle (0.02 inch / 0.5 mm or more) are considered rain. However, smaller drops are also considered raindrops if, in contrast to drizzle, they are widely separated.

How Does Drizzle Differ from Rain?

Rain and drizzle are both forms of precipitation, but they differ in many ways. Drizzle is a light, mist-like precipitation that is composed of tiny, uniform droplets. It usually falls in a light, steady stream and is usually accompanied by fog. On the other hand, rain is a form of precipitation that is composed of larger droplets that are usually spread out more widely and fall more heavily.

The most obvious difference between rain and drizzle is the size of the droplets. Rain droplets are usually around 0.5 mm in diameter or larger and often appear as separate drops falling from the sky. Drizzle droplets, on the other hand, are much smaller and are typically around 0.2 mm in diameter or less. This difference in size makes it difficult for drizzle droplets to reach the ground and so they usually evaporate before they can reach the ground.

Another difference between rain and drizzle is the amount of water they contain. Rain droplets contain a higher concentration of water, while drizzle droplets contain a much lower concentration. This means that drizzle is much less likely to cause flooding and other water-related disasters than rain.

The rate at which rain and drizzle fall from the

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