How to Calculate Liquid Limit?

Li = (pl − natural water content) ÷ pi. Is determined by subtracting the plastic limit from the natural water content of the sample, then dividing by the plasticity index. Soils with a li of 1 or more will be closer to the liquid state.

Calculating the liquid limit of soil is a very important step in understanding the properties of soils. The liquid limit, also known as the Atterberg limit, is a measure of the consistency of a soil.

It is the water content at which a soil changes from a liquid to a semisolid state. Knowing the liquid limit of a soil can help engineers and scientists determine the soils suitability for use in construction, agriculture, and other applications.

The liquid limit test is a simple procedure that involves measuring the amount of water needed to change a soil sample from a solid state to a semisolid state.

To perform this test, a soil sample is placed in a brass cup, which is then filled with water. As the water is added, the soil sample is mixed and kneaded with a spatula.

The amount of water needed to cause a change in the consistency of the soil sample is then measured. The liquid limit of a soil can be calculated by first determining the water content at which the soil sample transitions from a solid to a semisolid state.

This is done by plotting the water content of the soil sample at different points during the kneading process. At the point where the soil sample transitions from a

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