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What Are the Structural Classifications of Joints?

The structural classification divides joints into fibrous, cartilaginous, and synovial joints depending on the material composing the joint and the presence or absence of a cavity in the joint. The functional classification divides joints into three categories: synarthroses, amphiarthroses, and diarthroses.

What Are the Structural Classifications of Joints?

Joints are classified according to their structure and function. The four main types of joints are fibrous, cartilaginous, synovial, and amphiarthrodial.

Fibrous joints are held together by connective tissue, such as ligaments or tendons. Examples of fibrous joints include the joints between the bones of the skull and the joints between the vertebrae.

Cartilaginous joints are held together by cartilage. Examples of cartilaginous joints include the joints between the ribs and the sternum, and the joints between the vertebrae.

Synovial joints are the most common type of joint in the body. They are held together by a joint capsule, which is a connective tissue that surrounds the joint.

The joint capsule is filled with synovial fluid, which lubricates the joint and helps to reduce friction. Examples of synovial joints include the joints of the arms and legs, the joints of the fingers and toes, and the joints of the jaw.

Amphiarthrodial joints are joints that allow limited movement. Examples of amphiarthrodial joints include the joints between the vertebrae and the joints between the bones of the pelvis

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