Why Is the Contour Interval Included on a Topographic Map?

Why is the contour interval included on a topographic map? It tells you the change in elevation from line to line. The Mercator projection map shows the earth’s features on a grid.

Why Is the Contour Interval Included on a Topographic Map?

Topographic maps are an important tool geographers, surveyors, and other professionals use to measure and chart the land. A topographic map is a large-scale map that shows the relief of the land, or the elevation of the land, in a visual form. A topographic map gives you a much more detailed view of a piece of land than a standard map. One of the key features of a topographic map is the contour interval. The contour interval is the vertical distance between two successive contour lines and is usually represented by an evenly spaced number, such as 10 or 20 feet.

The contour interval is included on topographic maps to show the elevation of the land in a three-dimensional view. The contour lines on a topographic map are concentric circles connecting points of equal elevation. Each contour line on a map is a certain vertical distance apart and that vertical distance is the contour interval. The contour interval is usually shown in the legend of the map.

The contour interval is an important feature on topographic maps because it provides the viewer with an indication of the steepness of the land. If the distance between the contour lines is small, then the land is steep. If the

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